Climate Change

Weed cover in olive orchards enhances the ecosystem’s capacity as a CO2 sink

In the experiment, instruments measuring high frequency (10Hz) variables like CO2 concentration in the air, wind velocity and direction.

Scientists at the University of Granada (UGR) studied the effects and benefits of maintaining vegetation, or weed cover, in olive grove soil. In a recently-published article in the journal Agriculture, Ecosystems and Environment, these scientists showed their results after a year of measuring an olive grove in Jaen (SE Spain), which show that weed cover significantly increases carbon uptake, acting as a sink for one of the principal greenhouse effect gases, CO2. Read more »

Ocean warmth predicts US drought and fire risk

Folsom Lake, California, in November 2015: Drought prediction is improving. Image: By Vince Migliore via Wikimedia Commons

By Tim Radford, Climate News Network Read more »

Are estimates of our ‘carbon budget’ wrong?

Smokestacks filling the air with carbon pollution, Dartmouth, Nova Scotia, Canada © Owen Byrne, (CC BY-SA 2.0)

While most climate scientists, including the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change, implicitly define “preindustrial” to be in the late 1800’s, new research suggests that a true non-industrially influenced baseline is probably further in the past.

The researchers are concerned because the baseline affects the available carbon budget for meeting the 2 degrees Celsius (3.6 degrees Fahrenheit) warming limit agreed to in the Paris Conference of 2015. Read more »

Global stocktake shows the 43 greenhouse gases driving global warming

A wide range of industrial processes have released greenhouse gases into the atmosphere. Paulo Resende/Shutterstock.com

The most comprehensive collection of atmospheric greenhouse gas measurements, published today, confirms the relentless rise in some of the most important greenhouse gases.

The data show that today’s aggregate warming effect of carbon dioxide (CO₂), methane (CH₄) and nitrous oxide (N₂O) is higher than at any time over the past 800,000 years, according to ice core records. Read more »

We need to get rid of carbon in the atmosphere, not just reduce emissions


Image 20170405 5739 mj4uv3

Humans have burned 420 billion tonnes of carbon since the start of the industrial revolution. Half of it is still in the atmosphere.
Reuters/Stringer

Read more »

Molecular signature shows plants are adapting to increasing atmospheric CO2

Plantago lanceolate, the plantain found in the high carbon dioxide springs in Bossoleto, Italy.

Plants are adapting to increasing atmospheric CO2 according to a new study from the University of Southampton. The research, published in the journal Global Change Biology, provides insight into the long-term impacts of rising CO2 and the implications for global food security and nature conservation. Read more »

How two degrees of warming may turn into four

Warming in the Mediterranean region will exceed two degrees. This region – the picture shows the Pantà de Sau Reservoir in Catalonia – is already suffering from heat waves and drought. (Photograph: flickr.com/Josep Enric)

At the recent COP21 climate conference in Paris, delegates reached an agreement that plans to limit global warming to “well below” two degrees Celsius. This stems from the fact that scientists and politicians now agree: the global average temperature must rise by no more than two degrees if we are to prevent serious, irreversible damage to humans and the environment. Read more »

Mountain climbing more dangerous due to climate change

Climate change increases the danger of falling rocks in the Alps and other mountain regions, adding to existing risks for mountain climbers. This is the conclusion of a study by Arnaud Temme of Wageningen University using climbing guides written by mountaineers in the past. Read more »

Overcoming hurdles to climate change adaptation in the Arctic

| Image 1 of 2 |
Arctic communities are able to overcome hurdles and adapt to climate change say McGill researchers, credit: Joanna Petrasek Macdonald

Outdated land management practices, a dearth of local decision-making bodies with real powers, a lack of long-term planning, along with long-standing educational and financial disempowerment and marginalization are among the hurdles the prevent Arctic communities from adapting to climate change, says a McGill-led research team. But Arctic communities inherently have the capacity to adapt to significant climate change. That's partly because they are used to accepting a changeable and uncertain climate. Read more »

Study reveals disturbing hunger trends in world's highland areas

While global hunger figures are decreasing, the number of food insecure people in mountain areas rose 30 percent between 2000 and 2012, according to a new study, released today by FAO and the Mountain Partnership on International Mountain Day. Read more »

Syndicate content