Conservation

Brazil ranked world's most deadly nation for land activists as impunity reigns

A farmer evicted from this home in a land conflict with a powerful rancher poses for a photograph outside of Boca do Acre in Amazonas State, Brazil on May 26, 2017 (© Chris Arsenault, Thomson Reuters Foundation)

Standing beside broken floor boards and corrugated iron that once made-up his two-room house in the Amazon rainforest, Brazilian farmer Manoel Freitas da Conceicao is on the frontline of the world's most violent country for land activists.

Data released on 13th July 2017 by London-based campaign group Global Witness showed that 49 of 200 land rights activists killed last year were from South America's largest country, making Brazil the world's most dangerous nation for campaigners. Read more »

Aquaculture is main driver of mangrove losses

Mangroves provide coastal protection and habitat for several species. Shahnoor Habib Munmun | Wikimedia Commons

By Dyna Rochmyaningsih

Expanding aquaculture in South-East Asia over the last two decades has been the main driver of mangrove loss in the world, says a study published in PLOS One this month (June 2017).
Read more »

Bee groups embrace new EU partnership with trust the key

Beekeepers, scientists, policy-makers and other relevant parties are to set up a European bee partnership that could transform the way bee health is assessed in the EU.

The pledge was the main outcome of a major scientific meeting held in Brussels on Monday 26th June 2017 entitled “Towards a European Bee Partnership” that was attended by more than 120 delegates from scientific organisations, EU bodies, researchers, beekeeper and farmers’ groups, and NGOs.

Willingness to collaborate Read more »

Countries signed to UN-brokered illegal fishing treaty meet for first time

Fishermen unload their catch of mackerel at a fish market. UN Photo/M Guthrie

For the first time since a United Nations-brokered treaty to stop illegal, unreported and unregulated (IUU) fishing went into force, the countries that endorsed it are meeting in Norway to discuss how to make it a success. Read more »

Sir David Attenborough highlights destruction of the natural world within a generation

Sir David Attenborough delivering his lecture at DeMontfort Hall

‘If we damage the natural world, we damage ourselves. We can only hope that the human race will slowly come to its senses and perhaps for the first time since recorded history began the human race- homo sapiens – will bury its differences and work together to try and protect the one essential powerful thing we have in common - which is the natural world.’ Sir David Attenborough speaking at the University of Leicester. Read more »

'From Potato to Planet' - Soil Association reveals new film to celebrate World Soil Day

Saturday December 5th is World Soil Day and as part of its Soil Campaign the Soil Association is launching a new film made to spread the word about why soil is so important far and wide. And of course what we can all do to make a difference.

The film has been made with Aardman Animations (the people behind Wallace & Gromit and Shaun the Sheep) and as well as helping to understand the importance of soil to the planet, it also shines a spotlight on the role organic farming and shopping can play in protecting our soils. Read more »

New research shows that honey bee queens are highly vulnerable to two neonicotinoid insecticides

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A marked honey bee queen used during the study. She is shown on a wax comb with adult workers, capped cells containing maturing workers, and open cells containing eggs that will develop into workers. (Photo: Geoffrey Williams, University of Bern)

Throughout the northern hemisphere beekeepers have struggled to maintain adequate numbers of honey bee colonies for crop pollination and honey production due to dramatic increases in colony deaths each year. Recent surveys of beekeepers suggest that poor queen health is an important reason for these losses, but why queen health is now being affected is not understood. Read more »

Crisis in global oceans as populations of marine species halve in size since 1970

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White tip reef shark, Triaenodon obesus, close-up. Phoenix Islands, Kiribati. (© Cat Holloway / WWF)

WWF’s Living Blue Planet report, an updated study of marine mammals, birds, reptiles and fish, shows a decline of 49 per cent in the size of marine populations between 1970 and 2012. As well as being disastrous for ecosystems, these findings spell trouble for all nations, especially people in the developing world who depend heavily on the ocean’s resources. Read more »

Rapid decline in bumblebee species caused by climate change, study finds

Bumblebee (UFZ)

In the most comprehensive analysis of climate change impacts on critical pollinators, researchers have found that rapid declines in bumblebee species across North America and Europe have a strong link to climate change. The study was published in Science. It was conducted by scientists from University of Ottawa and other North American institutions. Scientists from the Helmholtz Centre for Environmental Research (UFZ), as one of the major partners from Europe, were responsible for coordinating basic data collection. Read more »

Taking nature's best ideas to solve human problems

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The IBERS living walls on Gogerddan campus

A newly established Plants & Architecture Network has been set up between Aberystwyth, Bangor and Cardiff Universities with funding via Welsh Government’s Sêr Cymru National Research Network for Low Carbon, Energy and the Environment (NRN-LCEE). Read more »

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