Research

‘Omnipresent’ effects of human impact on England’s landscape revealed by University of Leicester geologists

Junkin’s Quarry, Nuneaton, representing an example of Worked Ground that was active from the 1840s to the 1980s.

‘Omnipresent’ signs demonstrating the effects of human impact on England’s landscape have been revealed by researchers from the University of Leicester.

Concrete structures forming a new, human-made rock type; ash particles in the landscape; and plastic debris are just a few of the new materials irreversibly changing England’s landscape and providing evidence of the effects of the Anthropocene, the research suggests. Read more »

Plastics leave permanent indestructible legacy

Stomach contents of an albatross chick photographed in the Pacific in 2009. Image: By Chris Jordan (via US Fish & Wildlife Service HQ)

By Tim Radford, Climate News Network
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Are estimates of our ‘carbon budget’ wrong?

Smokestacks filling the air with carbon pollution, Dartmouth, Nova Scotia, Canada © Owen Byrne, (CC BY-SA 2.0)

While most climate scientists, including the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change, implicitly define “preindustrial” to be in the late 1800’s, new research suggests that a true non-industrially influenced baseline is probably further in the past.

The researchers are concerned because the baseline affects the available carbon budget for meeting the 2 degrees Celsius (3.6 degrees Fahrenheit) warming limit agreed to in the Paris Conference of 2015. Read more »

APC launches competition to facilitate funding for the UK’s first automotive battery manufacturing development centre

The Advanced Propulsion Centre (APC) has launched a competition to facilitate funding of the UK’s first automotive battery manufacturing development centre, in conjunction with Innovate UK. The funding opportunity is a major step forward in ensuring the UK becomes a global leader in the development and production of electric vehicles (EVs). Read more »

Henderson Island: the remote paradise with the world's biggest plastic problem

In the middle of the South Pacific Ocean, far from the urban, developed world, there is a small, lush, green island with white sand beaches. However, this uninhabited, remote corner of the tropics—Henderson Island—also has a trash problem. Read more »

Aquaculture is main driver of mangrove losses

Mangroves provide coastal protection and habitat for several species. Shahnoor Habib Munmun | Wikimedia Commons

By Dyna Rochmyaningsih

Expanding aquaculture in South-East Asia over the last two decades has been the main driver of mangrove loss in the world, says a study published in PLOS One this month (June 2017).
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Green space – how much is enough, and what's the best way to deliver it?

Providing green space can deliver health, social and environmental benefits for all urban residents – few other public health interventions can achieve all of this. (© Anne Cleary)

Half of the world’s people now live in urban areas. This creates competition for resources and increases pressure on already limited green space.

Many urban areas are still experiencing active degradation or removal of green space. To reverse this trend and ensure the multiple benefits of green space are realised, we urgently need to move toward on-ground action. Read more »

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