Neonicotinoid insecticides linked to wild bee decline across England

English oil seed rape field (© Heather Lowther / Centre for Ecology & Hydrology)

Exposure to neonicotinoid seed treated oilseed rape crops has been linked to long-term population decline of wild bee species across the English countryside, according to research published in Nature Communications. Read more »

‘Ecosystem canaries’ provide early warning signs of catastrophic changes to ecosystems

Study co-author Enlou Zhang collecting a sediment core in Lake Erhai for analysis of midges

New research, led by the University of Southampton, demonstrates that ‘ecosystem canaries’ can provide early warning signals of large, potentially catastrophic, changes or tipping points in ecosystems.

Like canaries that coal miners used to check for poisonous gasses deep underground, ‘ecosystem canaries’ are species that are often the first to disappear from a stressed ecosystem. Their vanishing can be linked to changes in the functioning of ecosystems, which can serve as a warning that a tipping point is approaching. Read more »

Sitting in traffic jams is officially bad for you

With millions of motorists in the UK set to hit the road for the bank holiday weekend, drivers have been urged to close windows and turn off fans while in traffic jams to avoid breathing in dangerously high levels of air pollution. Latest research from the University of Surrey has shown that simple adjustment to your car’s ventilation system while sitting in traffic jams can greatly affect your exposure to toxic fumes by up to 76%.

China’s honey bee losses are low compared with West

Honeybee (credit Steve Burt - Flickr)

Since concern about widespread honey bee colony losses began ten years ago, there have been surveys carried out to assess winter losses in North America and many European countries. So far, the picture in China, the largest beekeeping country in the world, has been unclear. Now for the first time, information about winter losses from a large-scale survey carried out from 2010-13 has been published. Read more »

Forest and watercourse interplay important for restorations

Riparian forests at Bjurbäcken – a tributary to the Vindel River. The forest in the foreground is flooded in spring. Photo: Christer Nilsson.

Humans utilise forests and watercourses in a way that depletes ecosystem habitats, biodiversity and ecosystem services. Many areas are restored to break the trend, but to succeed you need to consider not only the ecosystem in mind, but also surrounding ecosystems. This is according to researchers at Umeå University in Sweden in an article published in BioScience. Read more »

Logged rainforests can be an ‘ark’ for mammals, extensive study shows

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Bearded pigs. Credit: Oliver Wearn

Research reveals that large areas of ‘degraded’ forest in Southeast Asia can play an important role in conserving mammal diversity. Mammals can be one of the hardest-hit groups by habitat loss, and a lot of research has been carried out to find the best ways to conserve mammal diversity.

Much of this research has focussed on very large-scale changes in land use and the impacts this will have on overall mammal diversity. However, many important decisions about land use are made at much more local scales, for example at the level of individual landowners. Read more »

Molecular signature shows plants are adapting to increasing atmospheric CO2

Plantago lanceolate, the plantain found in the high carbon dioxide springs in Bossoleto, Italy.

Plants are adapting to increasing atmospheric CO2 according to a new study from the University of Southampton. The research, published in the journal Global Change Biology, provides insight into the long-term impacts of rising CO2 and the implications for global food security and nature conservation. Read more »

Artisan Cider Festival

27/08/2016 10:00
28/08/2016 17:00

Event Description Read more »

Advanced Facilitation Training - London

20/10/2016 10:00
20/10/2016 16:00

Event Description

A unique day of interactive and participatory learning to build your skills and confidence as a facilitator, meeting organiser or workshop leader.

This will be unlike training you’ve experienced before – you’ll be challenged, engaged and hopefully excited while experiencing the power of deep facilitation. Read more »

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