Conservation

Bottom trawling causes deep-sea biological desertification

Microscopic view of nematodes © Cristina Gambi, Marche Polytechnic University

A study led by scientists from the Polytechnic University of Marche (Ancona, Italy) involving researchers from the Institute of Marine Sciences (ICM, CSIC) and the Autonomous University of Barcelona (UAB), has determined that fishing trawling causes intensive, long-term biological desertification of the sedimentary seabed ecosystems, diminishing their content in organic carbon and threatening their biodiversity. Read more »

Can you imagine your life without trees & forests?

March 21st was the International Day of Forests - a day for raising awareness about deforestation of the Earth’s forest and trees. People around the world celebrate it by doing different activities such as tree planting, art work and spreading the word on social media.

This short video was created by the Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations (FAO) - http://www.youtube.com/user/FAOVideo Read more »

Survival International marks International Women's Day with a portrait gallery of tribal heroines

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For generations, industrialized societies have subjected tribal women and their communities to genocidal violence, slavery and racism in order to steal their lands, resources and labour. © Steve Morgan

To mark International Women’s Day on March 8, 2014, Survival International has published a new photographic gallery that portrays the lives and stories of inspiring tribal women, past and present.

Tribal women have known brutal displacement, fear, murder and rape at the hands of invaders for generations. They have seen their lands taken from them, their self-respect annihilated and their futures become uncertain. Read more »

South West Coast Path crowned best British walking route

Looking out to sea on the South West Coast Path. Photograph by Richard Taylor.

The South West Coast Path National Trail has been voted the Best British walking route by Walk magazine for the second time in row and the timing couldn’t be more apt. In the past two months, the UK has suffered some of the most severe weather ever to hit these shores and the South West has taken the biggest battering. What the award and the weather have highlighted however, is just how well managed the coastline is for walkers. Read more »

Judging the effects of climate change on extinction may be easier than previously thought

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Ornate box turtle (Terrapene ornata) © Geoffrey A Hammerson

Although widely used assessments of threatened species, such as the IUCN Red List, were not developed with the effects of climate change in mind, a study of 36 amphibian and reptile species endemic to the US has concluded that climate change may not be fundamentally different from other extinction threats in terms of identifying species in danger of extinction. Read more »

Forests are key to the greening of European economies

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Poland ©FAO Forestry/Marek Bodyz

Europe's forest ministers and other high-level delegates from 40 countries have gathered this week in the Finnish town of Rovaniemi to discuss how forests can help European nations move further towards the goal of greening their economies. Read more »

Plastic found to account for the majority of marine microlitter accumulating in the food chain

Fluorescent polystyrene microspheres in the intestines of a water flea. (Photo © Outi Setälä)

Researchers at the Finnish Environment Institute have for the first time successfully demonstrated that microplastics are transferred in the marine food web. The study also provided additional support to suspicions that many plankton organisms are unable to separate plastic particles from their natural food and that they therefore also ingest plastic. Read more »

New study shows that protected marine reserves enhance resilience to climate change

Species such as the blue-throated wrasse were observed in greater numbers in a marine reserve southeast of Tasmania following protection from fishing, which led to greater community stability and resilience. (Picture credit Dr Rick Stuart-Smith)

A new study, led by a University of Southampton scientist, highlights the potential for fish communities in marine reserves to resist climate change impacts better than communities on fished coasts. Read more »

£120,000 on offer to create an inspiring green space using UK native plants

These special Grow Wild projects are one part of the overall UK campaign that aims to inspire three million people to take direct action for UK native wild flowers and get outside in their local communities

The second phase of a £10.5m campaign to bring people and communities together to sow, grow and support UK native wild flowers is underway. Grow Wild inspires people to get together to transform unloved urban sites into wildlife-friendly wild flower patches reconnecting them with the outdoors and with each other. Read more »

University of Essex project helps to protect the world’s wetland landscapes

Action to help preserve some of the world’s most valuable ecosystems is behind a major international project, led by the University of Essex. The culmination of the five-year project has been the development of an integrated action planning toolkit on wetland conservation and management, which can be adapted to help provide bespoke solutions to protect valuable ecosystems around the globe. Read more »

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